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Diabetes and Eyesight

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way we process food for energy and growth. With all forms of diabetes—type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes—the body has trouble converting sugar in the blood into energy, resulting in a host of potential health problems.
 
Diabetes increases the likelihood that common diabetes-related vision problems or diseases might occur:
  • Diabetics are prone to developing cataracts (a clouding of the eye’s lens) at an earlier age.
  • People with diabetes are almost 50% more likely to develop glaucoma, an eye disorder that damages the optic nerve often marked by an increase of internal eye pressure.
  • Macular edema (and macular degeneration) are more common in diabetics due to malfunctioning blood vessels in the middle region of the retina responsible for central, sharp vision.
  • Most notably, diabetes can result in diabetic retinopathy; an eye disease that affects the blood vessels in the all-important retina. Nearly 45 percent of Americans diagnosed with diabetes have some stage of diabetic retinopathy.
That’s why there’s no separating diabetes and vision. If you have diabetes, then you should understand vision problems that increase in likelihood as a result of the disease.

Diabetes Statistics

Over 21 million people in the United States have diabetes, with an estimated additional 6 million people unaware they have a form of the disease. What’s more, an estimated 54 million Americans ages 40 to 74 have prediabetes, a condition that puts them at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. According to a recent American Optometric Association survey, diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults ages 20 to 74.

Diabetic Retinopathy

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In observance of the holiday, our office will be closed from July 1st through July 5th. Have a fun and safe holiday.

We hope that you and your family have remained safe and healthy during this public health crisis.  Due to social distancing, we will be limited at the number of patients we are able to see in a day.  We appreciate your patience during this time.

What We Did To Prepare Our Office to Re-Open

  1. When possible, please come alone to your appointment.
  2. If you need to bring a companion to your appointment, we ask they wait in the car unless the patient is a minor.
  3. When scheduling for children, please only bring the child that has a scheduled appointment.
  4. Please wear a mask or suitable face covering as per state regulations.
  5. Doctors and staff will be wearing masks.
  6. There are protective face shields on our exam equipment.
  7. Sanitized exam lanes and equipment have always been our practice.
  8. Based on the CDC's latest recommendations, we have added extra precautions and additional steps specific to this pandemic.

Before arriving, please let us know if you are experiencing any symptoms of the Coronavirus or if you have been in close contact with someone that has COVID-19. Symptoms can include coughing, shortness of breath/difficulty breathing, fever, chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, or a new loss of taste or smell.

Thank you for your patience. We will not only get through this, but we will emerge stronger after it!